An analysis of the fundamental principle in religion

Kant pursues this project through the first two chapters of the Groundwork. The point of this first project is to come up with a precise statement of the principle or principles on which all of our ordinary moral judgments are based. The judgments in question are supposed to be those that any normal, sane, adult human being would accept on due rational reflection. Nowadays, however, many would regard Kant as being overly optimistic about the depth and extent of moral agreement.

An analysis of the fundamental principle in religion

Preface[ edit ] In the preface to the Groundwork Kant motivates the need for pure moral philosophy and makes some preliminary remarks to situate his project and explain his method of investigation.

Kant opens the preface with an affirmation of the ancient Greek idea of a threefold division of philosophy into logic, physics, and ethics.

Logic is purely formal—it deals only with the form of thought itself, not with any particular objects. Physics and ethics, on the other hand, deal with particular objects: Additionally, logic is an a priori discipline, i.

By contrast, physics and ethics are mixed disciplines, containing empirical and non-empirical parts. The empirical part of physics deals with contingently true phenomena, like what kind of physical entities there are and the relations in which they stand; the non-empirical part deals with fundamental concepts like space, time, and matter.

Similarly, ethics contains an empirical part, which deals with the question of what—given the contingencies of human nature—tends to promote human welfare, and a non-empirical part, which is concerned with an a priori investigation into the nature and substance of morality. Given that the moral law, if it exists, is universal and necessary, the only appropriate means to investigate it is through a priori rational reflection.

Thus, a correct theoretical understanding of morality requires a metaphysics of morals. The purpose of the Groundwork is to prepare a foundation for moral theory. Because Kant believes that any fact which is grounded in empirical knowledge must be contingent, he can only derive the necessity that the moral law requires from a priori reasoning.

An analysis of the fundamental principle in religion

It is with this significance of necessity in mind that the Groundwork attempts to establish a pure a priori ethics. Section One[ edit ] In section one, Kant argues from common sense morality to the supreme principle of morality, which he calls the categorical imperative.

The Good Will Kant thinks that, with the exception of the good willall goods are qualified. By qualified, Kant means that those goods are good insofar as they presuppose or derive their goodness from something else.

Take wealth as an example. Wealth can be extremely good if it is used for human welfare, but it can be disastrous if a corrupt mind is behind it. In a similar vein, we often desire intelligence and take it to be good, but we certainly would not take the intelligence of an evil genius to be good.

The good will, by contrast, is good in itself. What guides the will in those matters is inclination. The argument is based on the assumption that our faculties have distinct natural purposes for which they are most suitable, and it is questionable whether Kant can avail himself of this sort of argument.

The Three Propositions Regarding Duty The teleological argument, if flawed, still offers that critical distinction between a will guided by inclination and a will guided by reason. That will which is guided by reason, Kant will argue, is the will that acts from duty.

Although Kant never explicitly states what the first proposition is, it is clear that its content is suggested by the following common-sense observation. Common sense distinguishes among: Kant illustrates the distinction between b and c with the example of a shopkeeper 4: Because this person acts from duty, his actions have moral worth.

Kant thinks our actions only have moral worth and deserve esteem when they are motivated by duty.

In Tune With The Infinite: Buy Printed Book. The Basic Principle Of All Religions - The Universal Religion sincere heretic is one of the greatest friends true religion can have. Heretics are among God's greatest servants. This is the great fundamental principle of the universal religion upon which all can agree. This is the great fact. Analysis of the Fundamental Principle of Neutrality The text under the Fundamental principle of Neutrality includes three elements: the purpose of complying with the principle of Neutrality is . Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Principles of State Policy: An Analysis of the Bangladesh Constitution The Constitution of Bangladesh and the Fundamental principle of state policy: Freedom of Religion and Human Rights.

Scholars disagree about the precise formulation of the first proposition. One interpretation asserts that the missing proposition is that an act has moral worth only when its agent is motivated by respect for the law, as in the case of the man who preserves his life only from duty.

Another interpretation asserts that the proposition is that an act has moral worth only if the principle acted upon generates moral action non-contingently.

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If the shopkeeper in the above example had made his choice contingent upon what would serve the interests of his business, then his act has no moral worth.

A maxim of an action is its principle of volition. By this, Kant means that the moral worth of an act depends not on its consequences, intended or real, but on the principle acted upon. Kant combines these two propositions into a third proposition, a complete statement of our common sense notions of duty.

The Categorical Imperative Kant thinks that all of our actions, whether motivated by inclination or morality, must follow some law. For example, if a person wants to qualify for nationals in ultimate frisbee, he will have to follow a law that tells him to practice his backhand pass, among other things.

Notice, however, that this law is only binding on the person who wants to qualify for nationals in ultimate frisbee. In this way, it is contingent upon the ends that he sets and the circumstances that he is in.

We know from the third proposition, however, that the moral law must bind universally and necessarily, that is, regardless of ends and circumstances.A fundamental principle of the Bahá'í Faith is the harmony of religion and science.

Bahá'í scripture asserts that true science and true religion can never be in conflict. `Abdu'l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stated that religion without science is superstition and that science without religion is .

Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Principles of State Policy: An Analysis of the Bangladesh Constitution The Constitution of Bangladesh and the Fundamental principle of state policy: Freedom of Religion and Human Rights.

In Tune With The Infinite: Buy Printed Book.

Religion and Science (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

The Basic Principle Of All Religions - The Universal Religion sincere heretic is one of the greatest friends true religion can have.

Heretics are among God's greatest servants. This is the great fundamental principle of the universal religion upon which all can agree. This is the great fact. Reclaiming the Sacred: Five Uniting Religious Principles. another fundamental principle of all religions. Expert analysis and commentary to .

the fundamental principle of morality must be a categorical, rather than a hypothetical imperative, because an imperative based on reason alone is one that is a necessary truth, is a priori, and is one that applies to us because we are rational beings capable of fulfilling our moral obligations.

Answer (I hope you meant Fundamental Religion and not the 5 fundamentals of the christian faith.) Typically Fundamental Religion involves an authoritative God (or Lord) that is the supreme.

15 Principles True Christianity Teaches – CBMW